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I forgot I’d written this. Better late than never!

Disclaimer: I do not intend this post to be a ‘true’ representation of what it is like to be disabled. This is simply a snapshot of a short period in my life following an accident. I cannot begin to fathom what it is like to not be able to walk. Also, this is not the worst accident or most painful thing that has happened to someone. This is simply the worst thing that’s ever happened to ME. I do not wish to presume, make harsh judgements, or to offend anyone. Please let me know if anything here is not to your liking.

Tuesday 9th September
I had an accident a few weeks ago. It was a silly mistake. A lapse of judgement. Immediately afterwards, I was in a lot of pain andfound that I couldn’t bear weight on my left leg. I didn’t initially think that anything was really ‘wrong’ but had a panic attack, leading me to go into hospital with breathing issues. I was treated for my breathing and had no X-ray to have a look at the pain as at that point my leg was a ‘secondary’ issue. I don’t mean to be rude, but the student doctor was about 20, and I think he must have been on one of his first shifts in A&E. The problem was, as I’d come straight in from being in my PJ’s, they took them away and put me in a gown. My boyfriend was working and wasn’t there yet, and I wasn’t wearing any knickers! Also, (TMI!) I was on my period and was wearing a tampon. It was awkwardness all round and I’m not sure whose face was redder! He had a feel of my ankle, my upper thigh and diagnosed me with a strained groin. It’s probably my own fault for not making a bit more of a fuss. I was sent away after a dose of painkillers and some crutches, as I seriously, SERIOUSLY could NOT walk. I took the next day off work and assured them I’d be fine and I’d be back in the next day. As I was in bed, I asked my boyfriend for a glass of water and he left me to go to work. Remember, at this point we were still under the impression that I had a minor injury. What followed was unfortunately seven hours of lying prone in bed, unable to go to the toilet, to eat, or to even get myself a drink. I’d left my phone in the other room the previous night so was unable to call someone, too!

Thursday 11th September
The next day was worse. I’ve never, ever been in so much pain. I began vomiting from the pain, and was unable to take painkillers as I had an empty stomach. The best way to describe it is a white hot shoot of pain in my groin, down my leg and up my back but times like a million. Funnily enough, like I’ve heard about childbirth, I think I’ve blocked a lot of the pain out – I can describe it but not really recall it. By this point I was screaming in pain whenever I moved. I called 111 as at this point as my mum was going nuts, and we all realised that something just wasn’t right, and the service advised me to get to A&E within the hour. What a joke. Three hours later we turned up, after a lot of coaxing and pausing.  I would definitely win ‘slowest getting in and out of a taxi’ award. After two and a half hours of sitting on those awful metal seats at A&E, with pitying looks all round as I was in such pain, I was called. I was so thirsty and dehydrated from crying so much. The doctor who came to get me kindly got me a wheelchair but then tried to sort of lift me and sit me in it. I screamed and everyone was looking, cringe. In short, I got my X-ray and was very quickly diagnosed with a broken pelvis. It was a relief to know that something WAS wrong and I wasn’t just being a baby, and also to have some advice. I was sent home with some massively strong painkillers and my trusty crutches. Kurt kindly cooked at my request some plain pasta at 2am so I could take my painkillers and have a good night’s sleep.

Afterwards I was advised to rest, take painkillers, but at the same time, stay mobile.

Saturday 27th September
I went out for the first time today without my crutches. It was lovely, I felt so free. I went shopping, bought a few things. It’s nice to have a handbag, not a backpack. I went to a few places but went home quite soon (after about an hour) as I began to feel it. It’s only been a short while, but like the cliche, you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone. I did notice that people were walking a lot closer to me and often pushing past which made me nervous as I’m still fragile! I didn’t realise how much of a wide berth people gave me whilst on crutches! I was walking about with a massive grin. Here’s to a full recovery!

Recovered (1/12/14): I wont be running any marathons soon (like I would anyway!), but I barely feel the pain now. What an experience. Really opened my eyes to what I have to be thankful for.

Afterword I just want to say a huge thank you for all the messages of support. For all the lovely people at work who’ve brought me tea and carried things for me when I couldn’t do it myself. For my mum who’s made me laugh and called me to check I’m not ‘sprinting about’. And to Kurt who’s been there from the beginning. Bringing me countless drinks, washing my hair for me that second night, helping me in and out of the shower, putting up with my awkward sleeping positions, and grabbing things for me when I couldn’t carry them with my crutches. I love you all.

imagesWell, I’ve told you the ten things I can’t handle; now it’s time for a mind-cleanse. Here are ten things I certainly can handle, and want more of in my life. Let me know if you agree with me.

I’m sorry, this list wont be a stereotypical ‘I love walks in the park’, or ‘I love a beautiful sunset’, because yeahyeahyeah we get it, alright?

1. Walking/driving to work and having all the traffic lights on green

2. That feeling when you begin to drink a cold drink when you’re completely hungover
The wine-fog begins to clear…

3. Being really proud of something
It’s okay to give yourself credit. No need to be smug about it though, show-off.

4. A good internet joke
Yeah okay, most of them are really cringe, but it’s nice to be in the know.

5. That feeling when you just ‘click’ with someone
Man or woman, old or young, green or blue.

6. Sweets
I’m talking fizzy strawberry laces, Toxic Waste, PushPops, those pink/blue fizzy bottles, liquorice, that ‘gunpowder’ sour gum stuff…

7. Knowing that you love and are loved
Cringe. You know what I mean though.

8. Straws
I love a good straw. Colourful ones, bendy ones, eco ones, the ones you used to get on holiday with the sparkly ribbon…

9. Sleeping in
Knowing that you’ve got absolutely nothing to do that day.

10. Making lists
I’ve been known to make a list of the things I need to make a list for.

There’s so many more, but I’d be here all day.

Hope you enjoyed x

We all have things that we just don’t like. Stuff that really ‘sets your teeth on edge’. Things that make you twitch or your skin crawl. Most people share a common bond over 139009759386certain things, for example: nails down a chalkboard, spiders, Piers Morgan etc. That’s just standard. But as it goes, everyone is different – each person has their own set of things that they just can’t handle. Here’s my list of things what are well grim, mate.

1. Soggy bread
Just the thought of this make me feel sick. Can’t eat a sandwich with tomato in it, in case the bread is soggy. Can’t watch kids feeding the ducks on the river because the idea of the bread in the water makes me retch. Can’t even eat bloody trifle – and we all know that I’m not one to miss out on a drink.

2. Anything remotely ‘flappy’
Birds, moths, flies…anything that moves quickly and has wings I just can’t be doing with.

3. Blisters

4. The stuff in the sink catcher-thingy when you’ve washed up
It’s food. The stuff you’ve already eaten. It was clean when you ate it and now it’s further sanitised with hot water and soap. But no. Grim. I’d rather ruin my drains and just wash everything down.

5. An untidy/unclean house
Things have a place and everything must be in order. No, I’m not claiming OCD. I just can’t. stand. it.

6. Frosted glass
A weird one. When I touch it, or even think about touching it, I simultaneously “feel” it scraping against my teeth. Told you it was weird.

7. Peanuts/peanut butter/peanut anything
My brother used to chase me round the house with peanuts to make me retch. Seriously. Vom.

8. Holes
This is another weird one. I thought I was mental until I looked it up and realised it was a real thing. It’s like I can’t look at a group of holes, like a sponge or something. It makes my stomach turn over! I remember when I first got this feeling, after seeing this image in a book at primary school (totally disgusting). Google ‘trypophobia’, see if you get what I mean.

9. Spit
Looking back at my time in the hospitality industry, I have definitely cleaned up every single bodily fluid you can think of. No, really. All of them. Give me a kebab-beer-filled vom or a ‘nearly-made-it’ any day. Ask me to clean up that gob and I’ll run away.

10. The bottom of any hot beverage
Doesn’t matter if you make it in front of me, how lovely it is – I won’t drink that last 1/2 inch at the bottom. I think I remember where this stemmed from. I finished a friend’s hot chocolate when I was younger and she’d been dipping biscuits in it, so the bottom of it was some kind of choco soggy slush. I can feel my gag reflex going now.

Right, that’s it. I don’t know why I started this, I feel all twitchy!

Now tell me yours.

I’ll follow this up with a sunny ‘Things I Love’, by way of apology for any typos because I sure as hell am not proofreading this.

Happy twitchy nightmares x


We’d all like a bit more money.

Imagine being able to go down the pub and buy all your mates a round without sweating over it, or being able to pay your rent and then not having to rely on 11p noodles from Asda for the month, but actually being able to splash out and get some 29p pasta shapes instead. Cor blimey, let’s not get ahead of ourselves. Image

No but seriously. Imagine if you suddenly came into some money, say…a million pounds worth? What would you do with it?

Most of us like to think of ourselves as kind, merciful, generous human beings – according to the study Measuring Morality by Duke University, of which 1,519 people were surveyed. This might explain why when asked, many people talk about giving money to family, friends, and charities before talking about what they would spend money on for themselves. Aren’t we a kind lot.

Will kick dog for ca$$$h

They also went on and made the study a bit weird and violent.

Apparently, seven in eight of us wouldn’t kick a dog in the head for anything under a million. That does mean though, that eight out of eight potentially would do it if they were offered a million! Soz, Rover.

Also, by doing this study they also found out that 1% of people surveyed would kick a dog in the head for free.

After doing a bit of research on the net, it turns out that a lot of people dream about what they’d do if they had a shit ton of money.

Spend or splurge?

I’ve asked a few people myself and have put their responses below:

“After the government took out taxes, I’d use the rest by taking my family out for a Happy Meal at McDonalds.” – Robert

“Get on a plane with my boyfriend and worry about everything else later.” – Emily

“Pay my mortgage, pay my parents’ mortgage, give my sister a deposit for a house, buy ‘buy to let’ property. Go on holiday. Buy gold. Spent.” – Neil

“I’d save half, and give the other half to charity.” – Alice

“The only things certain in life are death and taxes. I spend the bloody lot!” – Steve

Or you could do what Andy would do:

Personally, aside from being able to afford 9090909.09 packets of Smartprice noodles, I’d take my mum away to a spa somewhere for a couple of weeks, drink myself silly, come back and buy everyone nice presents, pay off my debt – and save the rest.

What do you reckon? What would you do with one million pounds sterling?

Dream away and leave your comments below.

ImageI remember leaving university – almost two years ago now. I was bright-eyed, confident, enthusiastic, and really, really naïve. Great, I thought – can’t wait to join the real world and start my career now I’ve got my decent degree from a decent university. LOL.

Cue almost two years of slowly losing my confidence, slaving away in the hospitality industry*, envying the ‘real life’ people with their ‘weekends’ and ‘holidays’, as it slowly sank in that I wasn’t going to be hired just like that.

Oh don’t worry, said so-and-so, my friend applied for 100 jobs before she got hers.

My uncle applied to 500 before he was hired, and he doesn’t even like his job!

Great guys, thanks. Try applying for 1900 jobs and being rejected from every. single. one. I’ve figured out that snazzy bit of maths by multiplying the average amount of jobs I was applying to per week (around 25), by how long I was searching for (a long time).

So, I’ve compiled my top five tips and experiences from my venture thorough the horrible, unapologetic current job market.

I’m not saying I’m an expert – after all, I was rejected from 1899 jobs, before landing the 1900th (my dream job – good things are worth waiting for, everything happens for a reason etc etc etc) but I just thought I’d share the most common scenarios I experienced whilst striving to land that job.

Some interviewers are just absolute dicks

I was once rejected from a role because I was dressed too ‘trendily’. Excuse you. I was wearing dress trousers, a blouse, flats, and a River Island fitted blazer. I was told, in a hideously patronising manner to go down to M&S and buy a nice two-piece trouser suit. Get a grip. This was a non-customer-facing role for a company describing themselves as ‘lively and fun’ on their website, for Christ’s sake.

Also, I learned to hate being interviewed by women, and would always hope for a male. This was because sometimes I was shocked with the way some of the women interviewers looked at me during the meeting, especially if there was more than one of them. We all know that some women can be absolute cows, but making someone feel uncomfortable like that is so unprofessional.

Another interview I had when I had just started out, I was woefully unprepared for – the job description had said it was a customer service role (it wasn’t). Although the fault may lie with me, the interviewer basically traumatised me, taunting me with questions filled with jargon that he knew I’d have absolutely no chance of answering. Afterwards, he said we’ll let you know in the most sarcastic manner, and I just thought – what was the point? Did you get off on that?

Just know that not all interviews/interviewers you have will be professional and straightforward. Sometimes you’ll walk out and think wow. I do NOT want to work there.

They will ask you if you have any questions for them – have some prepared

Just have a few generic ones stored in your head if you can’t think of any during the interview. Things like ‘why has this role become available?’ and ‘will any training be provided?’.

It’s so awkward when they ask you and you’re like…nope…


Don’t set yourself up to fail, but be realistic

Go on, and have a look at the number of applications already submitted next to the job role. On less specific job roles, this number is generally always 100+. A HUNDRED people. That’s the first hurdle – even if you get an interview, you still have to have a second one before they will make the offer. You’re up against so much. The mistake I made in the beginning was taking it personally. But these people don’t know you personally. So don’t.

Don’t sit by the phone waiting. Something that used to really piss me off was them saying that they’d let me know by a certain day, then not calling on that day. Or worse, not getting back to you at all. Rude.

I remember every heart sinking moment when I received yet another rejection email or telephone call. I’m ashamed to admit it, but tears were shed, and wine was drunk.

After a while, I began to expect the rejection. I don’t mean by being really pessimistic and just assuming – I just became more realistic. If I applied for a job, I looked at the amount of people who’d also applied. If there was more/less people, then I assumed I had less/more of a chance. Somehow, this cushioned my disappointment each time I got another rejection.

This way of thinking made getting my current job all the sweeter. I’d really, really wanted it – and really hadn’t thought I’d even be considered let alone be brought in for interview. Again, tears were shed and wine was drunk – this time for an entirely different reason!

Think about expanding your job market ideals

I did my degree in English Language and Journalism. I began applying for journalism work non-stop. Soon, I had unpaid internships coming out of my ears, and hundreds of emails saying get back to us when you have some experience.

I decided to expand my net a little, because I was really limiting myself by what I was applying for. This is how I found and fell in love with PR. It took me a while to realise that just because I’d got the degree in journalism, didn’t mean I was bound to it for life. Realising that opened my horizons to a lot more opportunites.

Sometimes all the tricks and the tips just don’t work

You can smile all you want, bring along a pen and paper, have an encyclopaedic knowledge of the company, be dressed in the best bloody two-piece suit M&S have to offer, and you wont get the job. It’s rubbish, wah wah. Whatever. On to the next.


I really don’t mean to sound pessimistic and I’m certainly not trying to put anyone down. This was my personal experience, and whilst yes, most of it absolutely sucked, it’s made me the person I am today.

I’ve finally got my job, and I’m deliriously happy, and I really hope I’m doing well so far. It’s such a cliché, but I do agree that everything happens for a reason.

Keep at it, honestly.


*RE: the hospitality industry – I did enjoy my experience in the restaurant/bar industry because of the things it taught me. The reason I hated it so much was because it wasn’t where I wanted to be, or what I’d set out to do, and I felt like I was wasting my time, getting more and more stuck. In hindsight however, I realise that I learned so much – about communication, organisation etc that I can now transfer these skills to the career I really want.